Couples in Business

Tiffaney and John Malott are top earners in a skincare company that has sold more than $1 billion in retail product sales. John and Tiffaney married in 2006 and built their first company together for 5 years, working side by side in business and in life.

“There were times when we were ready to kill each other, because we both have strong personalities,” says Tiffaney. “Over the years, our relationship improved as we discovered each other’s strengths and learned to appreciate our differences.”
Here they share with us Top Ten Tips for couples to successfully work together.

Put the relationship above the situation. The situation will be resolved and over one way or the other. Make sure your relationship isn’t over with it.
Stay in love with each other’s differences. Your differences are what attracted you to each other. Don’t stop loving the very things that make you the amazing couple you are or can be.
Both of you should be active in your business, because couples cover more ground. Yes, one of you may recruit better, or the other trains better, or is the better organizer. No matter what, because of the two of you, your team will be better.
Listen… and love the different perspectives your partner brings. Different points of view create better business decisions.
Don’t put the business before your relationship. You fill your calendar with events, webinars, and appointments to build your business; be deliberate about scheduling time to build your relationship.
Set goals together. If both of you don’t have a say in where you’re going, it won’t be as much fun getting there.
Edify each other. It’s amazing how distributors often brag about someone else’s success story, but won’t speak highly of their life partner who helps them become their success story. And if your partner isn’t edifying you, you start first.
Communicate with love and respect. Even in a disagreement, fight fairly (and after the presentation or meeting is over). Sticks and stones may break your bones, but ugly words break hearts and destroy dreams.
Travel together as much as you can. Yes, you may have kids at home and can’t go every time, but create new, tax-deductible memories as often as possible. When love is flowing between the two of you, your kids benefit from it the most.
Confide in each other, not fellow distributors. If you can’t resolve it together, go to a Higher Power, not a higher rank.
John and Tiffaney Malott are featured as Master Networkers in our May/June 2015 issue. To read their interview and learn from their 10-year learning curve focussed on personal growth, communication skills and leadership, login to Networking Times here.